Topics Topics Edit Profile Profile Help/Instructions Help Member List Member List  
Search Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  

Should I Go to Their Doctor?

Social-Security-Disability-Forum » Should I Go to Their Doctor?  

  Thread Last Poster Posts Pages Last Post
  Start New Thread        

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tammy Wilson

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Friday, August 02, 2002 - 7:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have had Type I diabetes for 32 years and a lot of other ailments that go along with the disease altho this is my main one. I am now at the reconsideration level of my claim. They have set me up for an appt with a psychologist and medical doctor (their own - they pay for it). Is this a good sign that they are leaning toward approving payments and do they take into account that I've had diabetes so long. I haven't worked for a couple years and cannot work because of the nature of this disease. I'm in Kansas Thanks
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Paul McChesney (Admin)

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Thursday, August 22, 2002 - 5:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tammy, for some a consultative exam helps, but more often it causes problems. Some of the doctors who do these spend little time and are given no background medicals. Some see their job as to help the Administration deny you. One of the main things a good attorney does is to help you avoid these or give the doctor doing them the proper information.

The fact that a consultative exam is set is no sign that they are leaning toward allowing benefits.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Brown

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Thursday, August 07, 2003 - 7:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What are the (experiences)of the disability determation physicians used by the state? How can they justify mental disability with physical disabilty when you stated physical?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Paul McChesney (Admin)

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Saturday, November 01, 2003 - 6:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The State Agency, who makes the recommendation to the Social Security Administration as to disability issues, uses two sorts of physicians. First is an in-house, non-examining doctor who looks at the medical records and makes a recommendation. Usually this doctor is an employee on a pretty short leash, who recommends what the Administration wants him to. But he or she cannot do much damage.

The second is a consultative doctor, who examines you and gives a report. These are often also on a pretty short leash, and can do a lot of damage. One of the main reasons to hire a lawyer is to avoid or minimize the damage they do, by avoiding them, brainwashing them, or neutralizing them with stronger medical evidence.

In fairness, some consultatives, particularly those in small towns, are just regular doctors who call it like they see it.

For reasons I do not understand, the State Agency likes to send people who have mainly physical problems to psychologists to have their psychological condition evaluated.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

sherry beauchamp

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Wednesday, January 21, 2004 - 12:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My husband suffered a head trama from a motorcycle accident he was in on June of 2003. He suffered with a basilar fracture and temperol fracture as well resulting in the permenant loss of hearing on the right side and some vision impairments on the right side as well. He has been self employeed and now is unable to do all of the tasks given for his type of jobs he does. SSD needs more info and is sending him for an examination with a "I believe psychologist" MA and I was wondering what types of tests they will be performing? Thanks for your possible support. Do all states have different regulations? Were from michigan.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Paul McChesney (Admin)

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Wednesday, April 28, 2004 - 9:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It might vary over the country, but in my experience a psychologist who is a consultative examiner for the Administration is allowed to perfom either a "mental status evauation," which is a brief conference with the client, or else an WAIS-III IQ test and perhaps related tests. Some of these tests tend to pick up the sort of organic brain damage that your husband might have.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Barbara Quinton (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Monday, February 13, 2006 - 12:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have neuropathy and herniated discs and have filed SSD, I was sent for a CE and that doctor didn't agree with my doctor, was sent to another CE and my case was sent to the doctors in SS office, now my case is in decesion writing. My doctor got the report from first CE and said that doctor didn't hear a word I said. Is it normal to send to a second CE. I was told by examiner that there was a discrepincy between doctors that is why I was sent to second CE.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Paul McChesney (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1078
Registered: 5-2004

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Sunday, March 12, 2006 - 7:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have never been able to figure out why the Adminstration sometimes sends you to a second doctor of the same sort. It is not always when the first doctor helps, or hurts. It is often when a lot of time has passed.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Trennia (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Monday, March 13, 2006 - 8:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I had a hemorrhagic stroke back in July 2005 and I an 41 years old and I applied for disability upon my doctors advices I have not been denied but now I am told I have to now go to see one of their doctor who don't know me or my condition I have not hired a lawyer because i have not been denied yet. i am not sure what they could be looking for but having me to go to one of their doctor verses my three speciality doctor do they need someone to say i am not disabliltiy even though my stroke left me having a serizure disorder.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Paul McChesney (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1084
Registered: 5-2004

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Saturday, March 18, 2006 - 4:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If there is an unanswered medical question, the regulations say that they are supposed to use your doctor if he is available. But by one excuse and another, they generally use their own small stable of doctors. Many of their doctors create reports that make success difficult in most cases in which they are involved; some tend to be helpful, and some are in the middle. Most can be influenced by other medicals that can be submitted to them. Sometimes you can get them to use your doctor or another one instead. Sometimes that would be a bad idea.

Which of these posiblities apply in your case? The only way to find out is to give an attorney or other practicioner who works in your geographic area the name of the doctor and your medical records, and ask him or her.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Henry G. (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Monday, March 20, 2006 - 11:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Section 616.2 of the SSA Handbook explicitly states: "Your treating source will be the preferred source to perform the consultative examination.
I just wonder why the SSA/DDS can get away with routinely violating this regulation, and why Congress has not done anything about this. Haven't people filed complaints against the DDS and complaint to their Congresspeople?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

jean riley
Unregistered guest

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Tuesday, July 06, 2004 - 4:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

hi paul i wrote asking if i recieved a letter, after i have filed for ssd wanting to send me to 2 of their dr's is that normal procedure does that mean i have a good chance of getting approved? i haven't heard back from you i might have posted in the wrong place so i just resubmitted ? thanks.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Paul McChesney (Admin)
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 719
Registered: 5-2004

Rating: N/A
Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Tuesday, July 20, 2004 - 5:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jean,

You have a pretty good shot at disability, if the Jean that appears in the medical records matches the real Jean.

Your physical problems restrict you from any work that requires much standing, walking, or bilateral manipulation. That leaves basic clerical work, which with your education and at your young age, that is, under 50, the Administration would say you should be able to find.

If you prove mental limitations as you describe, or prove that you cannot persist at even this basic work, you have a good chance of establishing disability.
I have always had trouble figuring out why the Administration decides to send people to doctors; theoretcally they are supposed to contact your treating physician and try to get him to evaluate you, but they rarely do that; if that doesn't work they are supposed to send you to a doctor if and only if it is necessary to develop the record.

Sending you to a doctor does not suggest that they want to help you. Often but not always their doctors hurt your case, by painting a picture that is very different from the one you paint. I would rather arrange things so that my clients do not go to their doctors; that is one advantage of having a lawyer - though a lawyer is not always successful at keeping you away from their doctor.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Action:

Administration Administration Log Out Log Out  

This site is maintained by Paul McChesney, an attorney who has been practicing disability law for around 25 years in North and South Carolina.

If the subject of disability is important to you, or if you want to find out more about us, you should explore the rest of this site. To do so, go to our homepage, Carolina-disability.com.

Please don't take anything on this site as legal advice! Nor should you take any action, or fail to take any action, based on any communication provided through this site. Before doing that, it would be wise to sit down and talk to an attorney in his or her office. Please also see our disclaimer at this link: Disclaimer. We want to be as helpful as we can be on a website; please thank us by doing this.